Delkin Blog

FAQs about Flash Based SSDs

 

Flash based SSDs are ubiquitous in industrial applications. They take advantage of the reliability of flash storage and do away with the moving components found in HDDs, resulting in faster operations and lower risk of data loss. You can find flash based SSDs in a huge array of consumer and industrial grade applications, from laptop computers to complex medical devices. Although there are two kinds of flash memory—NAND and NOR—most storage devices are designed with NAND flash, or a combination of NAND and NOR. Is a flash based SSD right for your device design? Here are some of the questions that are often on the minds of OEMs and developers.

 

What exactly is a flash based SSD?

An SSD is a solid state drive, and a flash based SSD is one that uses flash memory, as opposed to a RAM based SSD. Flash based SSDs provide non-volatile storage, which means that it is not necessary for the memory device to have a power supply in order to retain data or coding.  Flash based SSDs are an alternative to HDDs, or hard disk drives. HDDs have spinning disks that must move to both read and write data during operations. With an HDD, the disk stores the data, while the data in a flash based SSD is stored on cells within the memory device. With a flash based SSD, the data is written and read using high voltage charges applied to the cells.

 

Are there different kinds of flash based SSDs?

There are different types of flash based SSDs, and the most important differentiating factor between them is the type of flash used. SLC NAND flash refers to single-level cell NAND flash. SLC is often used in industrial applications because of its reliability and speed. With this kind of flash, each cell holds a single bit of data, which reduces the risk of read and write errors and allows for the longest possible NAND flash life.

 

MLC NAND flash, or multi-level cell NAND flash, is used in some industrial devices and in a wide range of consumer devices. With this kind of flash, two bits of data are stored per cell. The read and write operations are slightly slower and more vulnerable to errors than with SLC flash, but it is still faster and more reliable than HDDs. TLC, or triple-level cell NAND flash, is another format that is used primarily in consumer devices.

 

When should I use a flash based SSD?

Because of the advantages of flash based SSDs, they are now being used more than ever before. They are especially appropriate for use in industrial applications in which it is necessary to have the upmost level of reliability, even in exacting operating conditions.

 

The best way to learn more about flash based SSDs and other memory options is to contact Delkin. Our customer service team is ready to answer any questions about your specific device needs.

 

Contact

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Related Posts

FAQs About the Industrial CFast Card

  Industrial CFast cards offer high-capacity storage solutions for applications that are migrating to a...

Industrial SATA for Controls/Automation

  In recent years, an increased use of controls/automation has revolutionized efficiency in factory settings....

Customer Success Story: Application Lifecycle Challenges

  In 2009, mSATA was introduced to the market to address the demand for consumer...

Answering Common Questions About M.2

  Flash memory form factors that are widely compatible and appropriate for a variety of...

Temperature and SLC NAND Flash Memory: What You Need to Know

  NAND flash memory is the preferred form of storage for everything from consumer smartphones...

Concept of Communication Network Applications in City
Industrial CF Cards for the Communications/Networking Industry

  Which kind of embedded storage is best for industrial applications?  It is an understandable...

Delkin PRD SD MICROSD
The ABC’s of microSD and SD Cards

  It used to be so simple.  Just select a Class 10 card and you...

Delkin Devices M.2 2280, PCIe, 128 GB SSD featured for the new UltraZed-EV

Delkin Devices SSD, Internal, M.2 2280 is featured for NVMe SSD capability to the...

Delkin S330 SATA SSD
SATA (Serial ATA) Technical Guide

  SATA Serial ATA was introduced in 2003. It evolved from PATA, and shortly after its...

Interfaces Form Factors
Industrial Flash Storage for Embedded Computing Applications

  Embedded computing applications are critical for both consumer and industrial devices. With such a...