Delkin Blog

SMART Data SSD Reporting: What It Is and How to Read It

Person on laptop evaluating SMART data

 

SMART data reporting is the key to monitoring the performance of your SSD and pinpointing issues before they cause a critical failure. SMART stands for Self-Monitoring, Analysis, and Reporting Technology, and it is a feature that is incorporated into most SSDs. The trick to using this reporting tool effectively is understanding the data that are being produced and how to interpret them, so you can make the right decisions about your application. There is no single, industry-wide standard used for SMART data reporting, so it’s important to understand the technology that is used in your SSD and to have your own internal process for dealing with SMART data SSD reports.

 

A Brief History of SMART

SMART technology was initially created to work with hard disk drives, or HDDs. HDDs are notoriously vulnerable to mechanical issues that could cause full system failures without warning. SMART data provide operators with information about temperature, noise changes, and other indicators that could suggest that a mechanical problem is occurring. This allows operators to make any necessary repairs or replacements before larger issues occur.

 

With the switch to SSDs, mechanical failures are no longer a problem. However, SMART technology is still used to manage system function and reduce the risk of failure. For SSDs, SMART technology is integrated into the BIOS and monitors storage operations.

 

SMART Data in SSDs

Although there is no standard for the exact data SMART technology will provide for an SSD, most systems identify the component that is having an issue, the current state and the state at which the system will fail, the worst reading the device has ever produced, and other data that can be interpreted by an algorithm created by the manufacturers.

 

The appropriate response to SMART data is at the discretion of the operator, who may make a repair. Alternatively, the operator may adjust how the application is being used or may opt to replace the SSD to ensure that no failure occurs.

 

If you have questions about SMART data SSD integration, let Delkin’s product support team help. Contact us today to find out more about SMART technology and other features of our rugged storage products.

 

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