Delkin Blog

All You Need to Know about the SATA Interface

Delkin S330 SATA SSD

 

SATA is an interface that allows storage devices to connect to host systems. Multiple forms of this interface have been developed to allow for increasing capacity and bandwidth. Understanding how the SATA interface works with SSDs and modules and the specifications of the different versions will help you make the right storage choices for your applications. Here are a few facts about SATA to help guide you towards the best options.

 

The Launch of the SATA Interface

Serial ATA—or SATA—was launched by the Serial ATA Working Group in 2003 to replace that group’s previous interface, called Parallel ATA, or PATA. SATA is significantly faster than the PATA interface, thanks to an increased data rate on the serial paired lines. This data rate allows SATA to transmit and receive data much faster than its predecessor. However, the ATA/ATAPI commands that were used in PATA are supported by SATA. This allows the command set to have backwards compatibility.

 

The Serial ATA Working Group has become a non-profit organization called the Serial ATA International Organization, which is now responsible for all of the management and further advances of the interface.

 

SATA Interface Revisions

The SATA interface has undergone three major revisions:

 

  • SATA I (previously called SATA 1.5Gb/s) – This first-generation product had a bandwidth input of up to 150MB/s. The running speed was 1.5Gb/s.
  • SATA II (previously called SATA 3Gb/s) – The second generation of the SATA interface ran at 3Gb/s and had a bandwidth throughput of 300MB/s.
  • SATA III (previously called SATA 6Gb/s) – SATA’s third generation runs at 6Gb/s and has a bandwidth throughput of 600MB/s.

 

There have been two updates to the SATA III revision, called Revision 3.1 and Revision 3.2. Revision 3.2, which debuted in 2013, offers the highest maximum SATA performance, at 16Gb/s. Revision 3.1 is mSATA, or mini-SATA, defined, while 3.2 has SATA express specs.

 

SATA interfaces are backwards compatible, so the SATA II interface will function on SATA I ports, and SATA III interfaces are compatible with both SATA I and SATA II ports. However, there will be loss of sequential read and write speed rates when a newer SATA interface is hooked up to an older port version.

 

Delkin’s product team is happy to walk you through everything you need to know about SATA as you choose industrial grade storage for your applications. Please explore our website or contact us below to discuss our product options.

 

Contact

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Related Posts

FAQs about Conformal Coating Benefits

  Solid state drives (SSDs) and memory cards are inevitably exposed to environmental conditions that...

Delkin Devices Technical Success Stories- Female Engineer- Businesswoman
Customer Success Stories: Evaluating NAND Storage Solutions in Embedded Memory Cards

  For customers shopping for industrial embedded storage solutions, comparing different SLC memory cards is...

Industrial Flash Storage Encryption and Security Features

 For industrial flash storage, data security encryption is a critical consideration. This kind of...

Embedded Systems for Power Applications

  When it comes to applications in the power industry, unreliability is simply not an...

Industrial Flash Storage for Ag Tech Applications

  The agricultural industry is the driving force behind one of the most critical pieces...

Frequently Asked Questions about Industrial USB

USB storage is one of the oldest and most recognizable forms of memory on...

Engineer Reviewing S.M.A.R.T Data
Customer Success Story: Finding the Link Between a Locked BOM, Speed, and Performance

  At Delkin, many of our customers tell us that one of the key features...

Understanding Embedded Memory Systems
Get the Facts about Embedded Memory Design

  Embedded memory drives technology for consumer, commercial, and industrial marketplaces. Virtually every bit of...

Delkin CFexpress
Answering Your Questions about Industrial CFexpress

  The challenge with today’s industrial devices is designing them to meet two competing demands:...

How to Find an Industrial Storage Supplier

Industrial storage suppliers are not all the same. While embedded memory is the norm...